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The Best Way To Ask For (And Get) A Raise!


We are referencing a blog from Forbes this week - check it out or read below: The Best Way to Ask for (and Get) A Raise!

I asked for a raise for the first time a few years ago. At the time, asking for what I thought I deserved and having a frank discussion about money was outside of my comfort zone — but I did it anyway. I researched the typical salary for my position, consulted mentors and confidants (and Google), listed my accomplishments, practiced my points countless times and stepped out to do a power pose before the scheduled meeting. In an ideal world, your boss would notice your accomplishments and give you a raise. In the real world, that is rarely the case. If you want a raise or promotion you have to ask for one. How do you ask for a raise and get it? I asked managers to share best practices for asking for a raise.

1. Share your goals and ask for feedback.

Have an honest and open conversation with your manager. “If you've been in your current role for at least six months, then in a non-pushy or self-serving way, have a conversation with your supervisor to let them know that, while your first priority is to excel in your current role, your long-term goal is to advance and that you want to make sure you're doing everything that you can to set yourself up for success,” says Danielle Harlan, Ph.D., the founder and CEO of The Center for Advancing Leadership and Human Potential. Don’t stop there. “Ask for their recommendations on how you can improve in your current role and what you can do to position yourself well for the next role.” Then implement the feedback so you’re on track when it’s time to make your ask.

2. Take on more responsibility.

"My best advice to fast-track a promotion is to dress for the job you want — and the job you have," recommends Jenna Tanenbaum, the founder of the smoothie delivery service, GreenBlender. "First, command the tasks and responsibilities in your current role, and then start solving the problems that your soon-to-be self would be working on. The only way to effectively do this is through careful time management. Understand the core strategy of your organization, ask lots of hard questions and align your priorities with that of the company. You'll be running the show in no time," she says.

3. Proactively communicate wins.

Jenn Grasso, vice president of product at the fashion subscription service Le Tote, says she gave an unplanned promotion to a product manager: “The most important thing she did was consistently exceed expectations in terms of her current role and job responsibilities. She always took on more than was expected of her, and managed these projects as well as her more senior colleagues,” she says. And she didn’t wait to share all of her accomplishments at once. “She was also great at proactively communicating her accomplishments to me. When she approached me with her request for a promotion, I already knew she deserved it! Every step of the way, she made it easy for me to see that she was a star performer who deserved a better title and salary." Moral of the story? Share your accomplishments early and often.

4. Demonstrate your accomplishments and added value.

Show your value. “You want to be able to demonstrate that you have taken on additional responsibilities, as well as provide specific details about your accomplishments. Share examples of projects you have completed and how they’ve positively impacted the business. Was there an increase in revenue? Did you save a customer? If you’ve received positive feedback from colleagues or other leaders regarding your work, be prepared to share that with your manager as well. These are not o